Sea tugs – Sea Tow CT http://seatowct.com/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 04:29:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://seatowct.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Sea tugs – Sea Tow CT http://seatowct.com/ 32 32 Shine a light on South Africa’s lighthouse-keeping heritage https://seatowct.com/shine-a-light-on-south-africas-lighthouse-keeping-heritage/ https://seatowct.com/shine-a-light-on-south-africas-lighthouse-keeping-heritage/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 09:16:41 +0000 https://seatowct.com/shine-a-light-on-south-africas-lighthouse-keeping-heritage/ The Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) is highlighting South Africa’s 180-year history of lighthouse protection this Heritage Month. The TNPA is mandated by the National Ports Act No. 12 of 2005 to provide, operate and maintain lighthouses and other maritime aids to navigation (AtoN) in ports and along the South African coast.littoral. TNPA, through its […]]]>

The Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) is highlighting South Africa’s 180-year history of lighthouse protection this Heritage Month. The TNPA is mandated by the National Ports Act No. 12 of 2005 to provide, operate and maintain lighthouses and other maritime aids to navigation (AtoN) in ports and along the South African coast.
littoral. TNPA, through its Lighthouse and Navigational Systems (LNS) business unit, operates and maintains:

  • The 45 lighthouses of South Africa
  • The Automatic Identification System (AIS) network, a coastal network of AIS base stations that provides real-time information on ships calling at the eight commercial ports, as well as on ships traveling along the coast; and
  • An AtoN service to the eight commercial ports through the installation, commissioning and maintenance of buoys, quay lights, breakwaters, range and sector lights, and fog signals (182 buoys, 144 lights).

South Africa’s first lighthouse keeper
South Africa’s first lighthouse keeper was employed in 1841 at Green Point Lighthouse in Cape Town, the oldest in the country. He was in charge of taking care of the light which was supplied with oil and then with gas, and the optics which was turned by means of a clockwork mechanism driven by a weight. He lived in makeshift accommodation next to the tower.

Records show that lighthouse keepers served at 27 South African lighthouses, as well as two lighthouses along the Namibian coast. Island lighthouses – Bird Island off Gqeberha in the Eastern Cape; and Dassen Island off Yzerfontein and Robben Island off Cape Town in the Western Cape – have proven to be the most difficult for lighthouse keepers and their families.

Island life
Supplies and provisions were delivered monthly by harbor tugs and were often delayed due to adverse weather and ocean conditions. It was very difficult to grow fresh produce due to the limited access to fresh water, and steak was a rare luxury. The children were sent to boarding school on the mainland. There were rarely other humans on the islands, and the isolation was suffocating at times.

But there were also many advantages. There was a plentiful supply of the freshest crayfish, mussels and fish. The children spent their school holidays in a haze of sun and spray. When helicopters replaced tugs to deliver supplies and visiting maintenance personnel, lighthouse keepers’ wives could visit the mainland each month to do their own errands and meet friends for a cup of tea and a chat. Lighthouse keepers traveled to the mainland once a year on annual leave, and relief keepers replaced them.

Dedication to duty
The lighthouse keeper’s life progressed at a slower pace, but the days – and nights – were full of activity. There were oil lamps to fill and wicks to trim. When gas lanterns were introduced there were paraffin reservoirs to be maintained and replaced. There were lantern lenses and panes, slippery with the salty sea air, to be cleaned, and countless brass linings and linings to be polished. There were hundreds of gears and levers to clean and grease, and diesel generators to maintain. Painting and varnishing were seemingly endless tasks, as the harsh sea air corroded the walls, doors, frames and ladders. Outside the lighthouse there were bushes and shrubs to be pruned at regular intervals to deter snakes and other local wildlife from settling in the tower or living quarters. At night, the lighthouse keepers watched the light and wound up the heavy clockwork mechanisms at regular intervals.

These were used to rotate the light continuously and at the correct speed. Lighthouse keepers also performed an important surveillance function and participated in numerous rescue and rescue operations along the coastline. When the SA Seafarer ran aground on the night of July 1, 1966 just in front of Green Point Lighthouse in Cape Town, the rotating lens stopped and light was focused on the ship to help helicopter crews carry people. on board to safety.

The impact of technology
Technology has come a long way from the early years of lighthouse keeping and has dramatically reduced the need for traditional lighthouse keepers. Incandescent bulbs and powerful LED lights replaced the original oil and gas lanterns, and electricity replaced the original weight clockwork mechanisms. Sensors determine when to turn lights on at sunset and off at dawn, and when to turn fog signals on and off. Automatic lamp change mechanisms replace faulty lamps while the headlight is in operation, and standby diesel generators provide back-up power in the event of a power failure. The “internet of things” allows technicians to remotely monitor lights, as well as solar photovoltaic systems used in some lighthouses.

Today, 45 lighthouses operate along the country’s coast, from Port Nolloth in the west to Sodwana Bay in the east, and all are fully automated.

South Africa’s last lighthouse keepers
There are only nine lighthouse keepers in service today:

1.Wayne Brown at Cape Columbine Lighthouse in Paternoster, Western Cape;
2. Peter Saaise at Robben Island Lighthouse off Cape Town, Western Cape;
3. Cyril Mkhulisi and Russell Solomons at the Slangkoppunt Lighthouse in Kommetjie, Western Cape;
4. Hubert Visser at Danger Point Lighthouse in Gansbaai, Western Cape;
5. Martin Peterson at Great Fish Point Lighthouse near Port Alfred, Eastern Cape;
6. Joseph Kannemeyer at Hood Point Lighthouse in East London, Eastern Cape;
7. Fuzile Komanisi at Mbashe Lighthouse near Elliotdale, Eastern Cape; and
8. Raymond Wyness at Green Point Lighthouse near Scottburgh, KwaZulu-Natal.

They maintain the towers and optics under their charge and assist visiting maintenance teams with projects and tasks where possible. They welcome visitors and overnight guests, and gladly share their vast knowledge and experiences. They build relationships with customers and help connect TNPA to the communities we serve. They embody the spirit of ubuntu because they understand the true value of respect, trust and teamwork.

Image: Unsplash


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/shine-a-light-on-south-africas-lighthouse-keeping-heritage/feed/ 0
The untold story of a huge submarine washed up on the Welsh coast https://seatowct.com/the-untold-story-of-a-huge-submarine-washed-up-on-the-welsh-coast/ https://seatowct.com/the-untold-story-of-a-huge-submarine-washed-up-on-the-welsh-coast/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 15:16:57 +0000 https://seatowct.com/the-untold-story-of-a-huge-submarine-washed-up-on-the-welsh-coast/ Monday September 16, 1935 was a normal day at Sully Point by everyone except the strong winds and tides offshore. However, unbeknownst to the people of Sully, at this very moment an alarm was being broadcast by wireless radio across the Bristol Channel. A huge submarine had come loose in transit, endangering anyone attempting to […]]]>

Monday September 16, 1935 was a normal day at Sully Point by everyone except the strong winds and tides offshore.

However, unbeknownst to the people of Sully, at this very moment an alarm was being broadcast by wireless radio across the Bristol Channel.

A huge submarine had come loose in transit, endangering anyone attempting to navigate the waters between Glamorgan and the west of England.

Read more: The night the Luftwaffe dropped bombs on a village in Rhondda, killing 27 people

The submarine, HMS L52, was then on its final voyage – en route from Portsmouth to Llanelli.

Originally built for the Royal Navy during World War I, the submarine was problematic from day one.

Built by shipbuilder Armstrong Whitworth in Newcastle, HMS L52 was first laid in 1917, launched in December 1918, but was not fully completed until 1921.

Carrying six torpedoes and armed with four deck guns, it was an intimidating machine.



A cable attached to the bow of the HMS L52 submarine after it was blown ashore at Sully Point

In his book “A Submariner’s Story”, former crew member Joel Blamey describes when a torpedo exercise at sea on the L52 went horribly wrong. During the firing, the engine of one of the torpedoes was started while it was still in its holster.

“The exhaust gases, mainly carbon monoxide, escaped into the torpedo compartment,” he wrote.

These deadly gases immediately began to invade the men, who were trapped without access to fresh oxygen under the sea.

“The gas quickly began to defeat the torpedo boats, and while on duty at the front blast station, I put on my gas mask to help pull these unconscious men out of the compartment,” added Joel Blamey.

Fortunately for the crew, as it was peacetime, the submarine was able to surface quickly enough to replenish the air supply and avert a potentially catastrophic situation for all on board. As they rushed to port, the affected submariners were treated for their exposure to the gases and resumed service a few days later. The submarine crew managed to escape without a single death.

Later in 1928, the L52 underwent a redesign at Devonport to keep it in a condition suitable for service, but the submarine was only seven years old.

On its way from Portsmouth to Llanelli in September 1935, HMS L52 was to be torn up and sold for scrap.

However, L52 did not make his last trip easy. On the morning of Monday 16 September, while being towed by another boat, it broke away adrift, free to float aimlessly between Wales and England.

It was not until three days later, on the evening of Wednesday, September 18, that the ship reappeared – sighted not far from the Glamorgan coast.

“Submarine stranded ashore,” read a headline in the Western Mail at the time.

To prevent L52 from disappearing again, the submarine was anchored.

Describing what happened, the Western Mail article continued: “She [the L52] first detached from the tug Pressman while being towed from Portsmouth to Llanelli for demolition. On Wednesday evening it was sighted and anchored at Barry Roads after drifting nearly 100 miles. “

Another newspaper, the Hartland and West Country Chronicle, also described what happened to L52: “On Monday, September 16, the obsolete L52 submarine drifted off north of Lundy while being towed away. from Portsmouth for the Llanelli demolition site. danger to navigation was broadcast.



The submarine was capable of carrying six torpedoes and weighed nearly 1,000 tons

After causing chaos for two days, at least now, the L52 was securely anchored and ready to resume its final voyage.

Or at least that was the plan.

In another twist, the next morning the submarine was gone again. As if trying at all costs to escape her fate, the L52 broke away from her anchor a second time, free to drift in the Bristol Channel.

“On Thursday morning, she broke her moorings again and drifted into the English Channel at high tide,” wrote the Western Mail.

But attempts to escape from the L52 were unsuccessful. Later that same day, the submarine ran aground at Sully Point, this time for the last time.

The exploits of the L52 were now also attracting interest in the British press, with the Daily Mail, the Daily Express and the Daily Sketch all covering it.

On September 21, the Daily Mirror featured a photo of the L52 driven ashore at Sully Point under the headline “Monster from the Deep”.

After being tossed onto shore, thrown casually against the unforgiving rocky shore around Sully Point, the L52 was now not only off-road, but worse for wear and tear as well.



Lavernock Point, near Sully

In fact, the sub was in such a precarious situation that he wasn’t even sure he could even leave Sully. The size of the submarine is hard to overstate. 235 feet long and weighing nearly 1,000 tons, the L52 was a huge ship that had run aground on the beach.

In the submarine’s accounts, there is no evidence that it ever reached Llanelli’s scrapyard.

“The abandoned L52 submarine was washed ashore on the west side of Sully Point on Thursday and left high and dry by the ebb tide,” the Western Mail wrote.

He continued: “Despite the efforts of the tugs and the Swansea Trinity House Warden, she was blown away at Sully. The tides are getting lower and lower and given the gales it will be extremely difficult to navigate. release it right now. “

To get the latest WalesOnline news delivered straight to your inbox, click here .


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/the-untold-story-of-a-huge-submarine-washed-up-on-the-welsh-coast/feed/ 0
Daniel Craig has been appointed Honorary Commander of the Royal Navy https://seatowct.com/daniel-craig-has-been-appointed-honorary-commander-of-the-royal-navy/ https://seatowct.com/daniel-craig-has-been-appointed-honorary-commander-of-the-royal-navy/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 15:01:54 +0000 https://seatowct.com/daniel-craig-has-been-appointed-honorary-commander-of-the-royal-navy/ On this rare occasion in your service, you may have met another soldier who, upon reflection, might be called a “saint” for his selfless courage and commitment to duty. And while very few of a martial inclination end up becoming saints, a Civil War veteran is being considered for canonization by the Catholic Church for […]]]>

On this rare occasion in your service, you may have met another soldier who, upon reflection, might be called a “saint” for his selfless courage and commitment to duty.


And while very few of a martial inclination end up becoming saints, a Civil War veteran is being considered for canonization by the Catholic Church for his dedication to duty.

And beards. There are also many veterans dedicated to beards.

Joseph Dutton was a Civil War veteran. He left the United States for Hawaii in his mid-forties, arriving in Honolulu with nothing but clothes on his back. He spent the rest of his life in a leper colony trying to eclipse his past mistakes “in his own eyes and in the sight of God.”

When Brother Joseph Dutton died in March 1931, former President Calvin Coolidge said:

Whenever her story is told, men stop to worship. His faith, his work, his selflessness seduce people because there is always something of the same spirit in them. This is where the moral power of the world resides. He achieved a vision that we all have.

Dutton joined the Union Army in April 1861 as a soldier in the 13th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. The Vermont native moved to Wisconsin when he was just 4 years old. At the age of 18, he enlisted to fight in the Civil War.

Although his regiment did not participate in any major battles during the war (only five men in the regiment were killed), he served faithfully in garrison and fought the guerrillas until the end of the war. Dutton was recognized as a “dashing daredevil” and one of the “best and bravest officers in the military”, reaching the rank of regimental quartermaster sergeant and then lieutenant.

Dutton’s life was not so prosperous after the war. He fulfilled the grim duty of overseeing the exhumation of soldiers who were buried in anonymous graves and moving their remains to national cemeteries. He married in 1866, but it ended in shambles when his wife cheated on him and they divorced.

For several years, he found refuge in a bottle. He rebounded from employment as an investor in a distillery company, employee of a railroad company and as a special agent for the federal government.

In April 1883, the former army officer turned 40 and decided he needed a change in his life. He was baptized in St. Peter’s Catholic Church in Memphis and took the name Joseph after his favorite saint, dropping his birth name of Ira. He lived at Gethsemani Abbey in Kentucky for two years, committed to a vow of silence and ascetic life.

Even though he was content to live his isolated life in Gestsemani, Joseph wanted to devote the rest of his years to helping others. He explained his motivation when he wrote:

“I wanted to serve a useful purpose for the rest of my life without any hope of monetary or other reward. … The idea of ​​a penitential life almost became an obsession and I was determined to make it happen.

He was inspired to travel to Hawaii after reading about Father Damien and his work with lepers in Kalaupapa. He arrived in Honolulu from San Francisco in July 1886 to offer his services to Father Damien de Veuster.

Daniel Craig has been appointed Honorary Commander of the Royal Navy
Father Damien, seen here with a girl’s choir, was himself canonized as a saint in 2009.

Hawaiians infected or suspected of leprosy have been rounded up by authorities and dumped in this isolated colony in previous decades. The leper colony on the island of Molokai was located at the foot of a chain of cliffs bordering the ocean that formed a natural barrier to the outside world. Father Damien transformed the lawless colony into a sanctuary providing comfort, medical care and a place of worship for those infected.

The priest took the 43-year-old vagrant under his wing without hesitation. Damien had been stricken with leprosy while serving the colony for over a decade and was in desperate need of an assistant and a successor. He would not die until three years later.

Daniel Craig has been appointed Honorary Commander of the Royal Navy
Dutton (far right) with two men from the Molokai leper colony.

Dutton worked “from dawn to night” as he cleaned and healed the wounds of “every kind that leprosy inflicts on mankind.” Dutton was as careless of being infected as Father Damien. One account of Dutton says, “Leprosy had no power to instill fear in his mind. When Damien died in 1889, Dutton succeeded him and tirelessly continued his work.

Despite the colony’s isolation, word of Dutton’s story reached the United States. Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Hebert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt all congratulated him in writing. Franklin D. Roosevelt said he should “be bred for the point of view and emulation of many others.”

Daniel Craig has been appointed Honorary Commander of the Royal Navy
Brother Joseph Dutton, center, with boys and men from Kalaupapa.

President Theodore Roosevelt ordered sixteen Navy battleships sailing to Japan to reorient their course in July 1906 and pass within sight of the colony to pay homage to the socialite saint.

With the outbreak of World War I, Dutton wrote to President Woodrow Wilson and offered his services in organizing “a few hundred veterans” of the Civil War to form a sniper unit. This was politely declined by President Wilson, but his offer did not remain unsatisfied. Dutton remained an American patriot for life even though he never returned to the United States.

Dutton died in March 1931 at the age of 88. He was buried in the cemetery of St. Philomena of Hawaii Catholic Church and was mourned by many. The army veteran who devoted part of his life to serving his country and the other half to serving others has never considered himself a modern day saint.

In the years leading up to his death, he wrote: “These writers make me a hero, while I don’t feel like one at all. I don’t claim to have done great things; I just try, to a small extent, to help my neighbor and my own soul.


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/daniel-craig-has-been-appointed-honorary-commander-of-the-royal-navy/feed/ 0
When the warring counties of Yorkshire and Lancashire finally connected the canal https://seatowct.com/when-the-warring-counties-of-yorkshire-and-lancashire-finally-connected-the-canal/ https://seatowct.com/when-the-warring-counties-of-yorkshire-and-lancashire-finally-connected-the-canal/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:32:46 +0000 https://seatowct.com/when-the-warring-counties-of-yorkshire-and-lancashire-finally-connected-the-canal/ THE first of the trans-Pennine tunnels is not getting the attention it deserves for two reasons. One is that it was built for a canal rather than a railroad. The second is that his name barely strikes a chord in terms of loving memory. It’s in Foulridge, near Barnoldswick. It is neither filthy nor piercing […]]]>

THE first of the trans-Pennine tunnels is not getting the attention it deserves for two reasons. One is that it was built for a canal rather than a railroad. The second is that his name barely strikes a chord in terms of loving memory. It’s in Foulridge, near Barnoldswick.

It is neither filthy nor piercing much of a ridge, but in the heady days of Georgian England it was fundamental in a grand plan to “unite the seas”. Rivers were already navigable from the North Sea at Hull to Leeds – and the Vision was a channel through the Pennines to connect with the Irish Sea. Hence what turned out to be Britain’s longest single canal and the longest to build. Since its conception in 1770, it has taken 46 years to complete the Leeds and Liverpool Canal.

The Yorkshire side of his route was straightforward, following the valley of the Aire to Skipton and onto Gargrave, and only three years passed before he saw his first traffic. Writing in her diary in April 1773, Elizabeth Shackleton recalled the opening of the “new canal to the metropolis of Skipton-in-Craven, much to the joy of the poor, and demonstrations of happiness to all kinds of people, from bells to bells and bonfires ”.

It should have been relatively easy to continue across the divide between Skipton and Colne with a tunnel at Foulridge, but things have now collapsed. As the first canal to connect Yorkshire and Lancashire, there was the long-standing issue of feuds between the two counties. Progress was in the hands of two committees, one meeting in Bradford and the other based in Liverpool. The Yorkshire committee was in control of the finances, causing such grief in Lancashire that it looked like the whole project was going to collapse.

It was not until 1791 that work finally began on the Foulridge Tunnel. Less than a mile long at 1,640 yards (1.5 km in today’s parlance), it was shorter than other canal tunnels already built elsewhere in Britain. However, it posed many problems and its name proved to be appropriate. The ground turned out to be unstable and steam engines were needed to pump out the excess water.

The work was undertaken by navvies – an abbreviation of the word “navigators”. According to a hellfire chaplain, the term came about because it sounded too much like “alligators.” He argued that a navy is like a human alligator, which feeds on helpless women and shy men, and scares children!

Much of the work used what is today called the trench and cover system with deep excavations before providing the tunnel lining, arch and earth replacement. It turned out to be difficult and dangerous, and it is likely that the collapse of the support frame was the cause of four workers receiving either a guinea or a half guinea depending on the nature of their injuries.

The company also paid one guinea’s surgeon’s bill – the equivalent of around £ 180 in today’s money. Although operations continued day and night, it was in May 1796 that the work was finally completed and the boats were able to continue from Gargrave to Burnley.

The lack of funds meant that the tunnel was built to small dimensions and did not have a towpath. The barges were laboriously “legs” through men lying on the cargo and pushing against the roof or walls with their feet. The tow horses, often driven by children in boats, were taken up the hill above the tunnel. A good track was created through the fields and a hut allowed the “leggers” to recover.

Financial problems and lingering wrangling in Lancashire meant that another twenty years passed before the canal was finally completed. In October 2016, a flotilla of boats passed through Skipton on their way from Leeds to Liverpool to celebrate the opening of the entire 127 miles.

It was now almost the dawn of the railroad era and in 1848 there was a parallel line running from Leeds through Skipton to Colne. It did not require a tunnel at Foulridge, and the faster travel resulted in a gradual drop in traffic on the canal.

Road freight transport dealt a further blow, but unlike other trans-Pennine canals, Leeds & Liverpool never closed. There is a certain irony that the railroad between Skipton and Colne saw its last train in 1970.

In recent times, recreational use of the canal has increased dramatically with a “traffic light” system installed at the Foulridge Tunnel to avoid traffic jams.

In 2023 it will be 250 years since Leeds & Liverpool reached Skipton and it is hoped that the anniversary will be celebrated in an appropriate style.

Piercing the Pennines by David Joy is published by Great Northern Books, priced at £ 19.99.


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/when-the-warring-counties-of-yorkshire-and-lancashire-finally-connected-the-canal/feed/ 0
A story of big fish – richmondmagazine.com https://seatowct.com/a-story-of-big-fish-richmondmagazine-com/ https://seatowct.com/a-story-of-big-fish-richmondmagazine-com/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 16:49:00 +0000 https://seatowct.com/a-story-of-big-fish-richmondmagazine-com/ In May 1779, Martin Hawkins reportedly saw a sturgeon near the Isle of Mayo while fishing shad. He gripped his fins and Rode the beast like a Colonial Pecos Bill. The 10-foot, 300-pound fish eventually grew weary of trying to fend it off, and Hawkins, according to the story, managed to beach the bulk of […]]]>

In May 1779, Martin Hawkins reportedly saw a sturgeon near the Isle of Mayo while fishing shad. He gripped his fins and Rode the beast like a Colonial Pecos Bill. The 10-foot, 300-pound fish eventually grew weary of trying to fend it off, and Hawkins, according to the story, managed to beach the bulk of the Manchester side of the river. There, the unlucky fish foresaw an evening of feasting and merriment.

Some 242 years later, after a September afternoon of heavy torrential downpours and rapidly rising waters, I followed up an invitation from the James River Association join the observers on the 40-foot pontoon boat Spirit of the James.

Our goal was not to mount or catch a sturgeon, but rather to observe the males. breach or jump out of the water.

These dinosaur-era fish are the largest creatures inhabiting the James. In mid-September, the fish from here make “the big comeback” to spawn. You can watch them break and fall apart.

At 6 p.m. we left Rocketts Landing, leaving behind the joggers, the marina bristling with boats and menacing condominium balcony decks, the steel-framed skeleton of an industrial building by the community pool and the row houses with a retro look. townhouses that look like some of the open spots near Fulton in one of Richmond’s worst examples “urban renewal. ”

The approaching dusk pushed sharp shards of blue between the battleship’s gray clouds. The speed of the Spirit of the James rose from the coiled shoulders of spray, and the rushing wind added euphoria to the acceleration. The assembled sturgeon seekers settled down for the trip. Several passengers held up impressive long-lens cameras.

Then we came across waves of plastic bottles and cups floating in a miasma. Our captain, Aaron Bouchard, environmental educator for the James River Association, explained that these wrecks erupted a few hours earlier into the otherwise clean river due to the “CSO (Combined Sewer Overflow) event) “of this afternoon. That is, the powerful rains flooded the city’s combined sewage system, which could not withstand the pressure.

During its August special session, the Virginia General Assembly allocated $ 411 million, of some $ 4.3 billion in federal funding under the American Rescue Plan Act, for drinking water projects in the over the next three years. This includes $ 125 million to repair combined sewer systems, including those in Richmond and Lynchburg, to prevent the eruption of untreated sewage into the James River during heavy rains. Richmond is expected to receive $ 50 million for a a total need estimated at 883 million dollars.

Our ship continued past two-story weathered metal docks, one of which featured a sign that, in a cheerful cursive postcard, exclaimed, “Welcome to Richmond!” Along the sandy harbor of Richmond, we negotiated around tugs pushing barges.

Bouchard told us about sturgeon. After swimming in the James for three to five years, they take to the sea. They belong to a special class, the euryhaline, which, thanks to osmoregulation, survive in both fresh and salt water. This gift of nature allows our sturgeon to return home twice a year. Unlike salmon, they neither reproduce nor die. Sturgeon can live up to 65 years. In the James, their most important predators are the transport vessels.

The fierce-looking fish, which has not changed in appearance for some 200 million years, protects its muscular back with five rows of bony plates, called scales.

But sturgeons are toothless.

They suck their food from the ground.

The sturgeon’s relationship with humans along the James River is complicated. Members of the Pamunkey tribe, due to the large size of the fish, accorded them great respect, and legends say that some may have foreshadowed Martin Hawkins and took a tour as a rite of passage. Captain John Smith, accustomed to tales of big fish, wrote that during his 17th century expeditions, the fullness of the sturgeons caused traffic jams that could hamper the progress of the small reconnaissance boats.

Sturgeons were captured and eaten by the early settlers, who did not see fish as a delicacy but as a means of survival.

Immigrants at the end of the 19th century were familiar with the Atlantic sturgeon and its eggs in the form of caviar. Meat has become an offering in the markets and restaurants of Richmond. In some crude cases, the kidnappers used chains to tie the huge troubled fish to the pillars’ stilts and bridge supports to harvest their eggs.

Overfishing, dams and pollution have driven sturgeon to near extinction. Virginia in 1974 made their murder illegal. In 1998, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission banned sturgeon fishing and poaching from Maine to Florida. And in 2012, the fish received an endangered species designation that coincided with improvements to the James River. Sturgeon sightings increased and other wildlife continued to re-inhabit the waterway.

During our cruise, Bouchard reported to us two separate bald eagles perched on top of trees and a flight of egrets. A great winged blue heron walked away along a stream as if it were running through a city alley. The Spirit of the James came to a stop within sight of the Pocahontas Parkway Bridge. The sounds of birds, crickets and cicadas floated towards us.

Why do sturgeons break up? Bouchard listed the possibilities: reproductive behavior (“Look, ladies, how high I can jump! “), a way to regulate your swim bladder or, my favorite: because it’s fun.

Julia Carson, senior environmental educator at the James River Association, stood ready beside a tripod-mounted camera.

“Sturgeons when they make a breach are not as graceful, like dolphins or whales,” she says. “More like a stomach flop.” She had recorded part of this action the week before.

A few splashes of sturgeon did occur, the sound reminding me of a fat person making a cannonball at the bottom of the pool, but I failed to spot the closest and loudest one, although I did. observed the plume quite large.

Sturgeon watchers said, “Ooohhh! As we do at a fireworks display.

We quickly turned around for Rocketts. I have contemplated in the turbulent eddies the great story of James, the first inhabitants who crisscrossed these waters in canoes like their highway; the Europeans who took the bends without knowing what they were going to encounter; those who chose a new life here and those who had no choice; sailors and warriors; explorers and exploiters and excursionists of steamboats enjoying nights of music and mirth. Coming from there, the illuminated towers of the city evoke a certain romanticism that the highways cannot match.

So let’s take care of this river, and it will take care of us. And if you’re lucky you’ll one day see a sturgeon leap forward in the sheer joy of living and being at home, again.


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/a-story-of-big-fish-richmondmagazine-com/feed/ 0
Fashion East Keeps Making All Your New Favorite Designers https://seatowct.com/fashion-east-keeps-making-all-your-new-favorite-designers/ https://seatowct.com/fashion-east-keeps-making-all-your-new-favorite-designers/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 10:52:30 +0000 https://seatowct.com/fashion-east-keeps-making-all-your-new-favorite-designers/ Fashion East Spring / Summer 2022. London, United Kingdom Editor’s Notes Here’s an unfinished list of London-based designers you might not have known without Lulu Kennedy, the fantastic founder and director of the Fashion East incubator: Kim Jones, Craig Green, Grace Wales Bonner, Mowalola Ogunlesi, Loewe’s Jonathan Anderson, Simone Rocha, Marques’ Almeida, Charlotte Knowles, Supriya […]]]>

Fashion East Spring / Summer 2022. London, United Kingdom

Editor’s Notes

Here’s an unfinished list of London-based designers you might not have known without Lulu Kennedy, the fantastic founder and director of the Fashion East incubator: Kim Jones, Craig Green, Grace Wales Bonner, Mowalola Ogunlesi, Loewe’s Jonathan Anderson, Simone Rocha, Marques’ Almeida, Charlotte Knowles, Supriya Lele, Jonathan Saunders, Ashley Williams, Nensi Dojaka, Liam Hodges, Asai, Matty Bovan, Richard Malone. Roksanda Ilincic, Stefan Cooke, Nasir Mazhar. Yeah, she did that.

The last three editions on this long list are as talented and exciting (if not more) than many of their predecessors. Maximilian Davis, Jawara Alleyne and newcomer Chet Lo stepped out in style in London’s first big IRL Fashion Week since the start of the pandemic – other Fashion East designers Goomheo and Hrh also came out on top.

Take Jawara Alleyne, whose second presentation for Fashion East aimed to show off the work in progress in the designer’s exploration of reusing, draping, cutting and recontextualizing garments that have long been inspired by Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. References aside, Alleyne makes a strong point by pointing out unfair expectations about what a young designer can and should spend on materials. The fact that each piece on display was made in her bedroom in East London adds to the practicality.

At Maximilian Davis, the 25-year-old designer, who for his first runway appearance brought together the A team of creative collaborators including Dazed editor Ibrahim Kamara, musician SUUTOO and fashion designer Nasir Mazhar . More understated than the clothes have been over the past two seasons, Max said the collection reflected childhood memories of family visits to Trinidad and reflected what the sea means to so many Caribbean people, “a sense of back home, longing and freedom. “

The sea theme was echoed in Chet Lo, whose first collection titled Splash, examined the beauty of vacation life, the fluorescent drinks that always taste best on the beach, and the mystical romance found in the 1984 film from the same name. Like many of us, Lo dreamed of escaping to a tropical island while in lockdown. Although that didn’t happen, he wanted to create a destination for his collection without quarantine on arrival, where mermaids exist, the swimsuit is pointy (a signature technique of the brand) and the body is inverted. Refreshing.

Highsnobiety’s shopping list

Sheer Tip Knit Pool Noodles by Chet Lo

Next summer you will all stay at least 6 feet away from me while I bathe among the tropical fish.

Chet Lo fluorescent XXL handbag

In this I keep my Chet Lo spiked knit pool noodle, spf 50 sunscreen, six pack of beers, equally large XXL beach towel (no Chet Lo), knit pool donut spiked and a small neon handbag by Chet Lo, both from the same collection as Chet Lo Noodles. A light pack for Chet Lo’s neon XXL handbag to keep its shape.

Safety pin t-shirt by Jawara Alleyne

You know Hot Topic would be the one to rip it off in the blink of an eye. But I’m from Europe where we don’t have a hot topic, so how would I know.

Maximilian “Dr No” collarless jacket

This all-white collarless jacket, inspired by the 1962 James Bond movie ‘Dr No’ is so beautiful that if I ever find the money to make it, I wear it everywhere. We’re talking at the airport, at work, at my future marriage, at my first son’s graduation ceremony, at Apple and the convenience store on the same route, and most certainly on the couch on my next conference call at the WFH.

Maximilian’s mule coat

Business in the front part in the back, “I-support-young-London-designers” sartorial style.

Exhibition piece of rubber palm leaves by Maximilian

Created in partnership with London OG Nasir Mazhar, Maximilian’s final look for his first runway collection featured spectacular rubber-coated palm fronds resembling sea urchins that paid homage to carnival, a central influence for the designer. A visual gift to all.


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/fashion-east-keeps-making-all-your-new-favorite-designers/feed/ 0
Visentini launches the first new generation Ro-Pax for Corsica Linea https://seatowct.com/visentini-launches-the-first-new-generation-ro-pax-for-corsica-linea/ https://seatowct.com/visentini-launches-the-first-new-generation-ro-pax-for-corsica-linea/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 23:03:45 +0000 https://seatowct.com/visentini-launches-the-first-new-generation-ro-pax-for-corsica-linea/ Corsica Linea’s new Visentini Ro-Pax, yard number 238, is maneuvered out of the construction dock of the Italian shipyard. Picture: Corsica Linea. Corsica Linea has confirmed that the Italian shipyard Visentini has released their new unnamed ferry, hull number 238. The new Ro-Pax vessel is the first to be built to a completely new design […]]]>

Corsica Linea has confirmed that the Italian shipyard Visentini has released their new unnamed ferry, hull number 238. The new Ro-Pax vessel is the first to be built to a completely new design at the yard in over two decades. While the previous 27 Ro-Pax ferries were built in several different configurations, all could trace their basic design back to the original. MERSEY VIKING built for Norse Merchant Ferries.

Changes in legislation and market conditions mean that Visentini commissioned NAOS Design to come up with a new series. The last vessel to be delivered on the basis of the “old” platform was the NGV BRIDGE which was delivered earlier this year.

Corsica Linea's new Visentini Ro-Pax, yard number 238, is maneuvered out of the construction dock of the Italian shipyard.  Picture: Corsica Linea.
Corsica Linea’s new Visentini Ro-Pax, yard number 238, is maneuvered out of the construction dock of the Italian shipyard. Picture: Corsica Linea.

The biggest of Visentini to date

The new Corsica Linea has a new, more efficient bow design called FlexBow 2.0. This is an improved design of the FlexBow introduced with LAGAN VIKING (ii). This vessel later became STENA LAGAN and was rebuilt as STENA SCANDICA earlier this year. The new Visentini design is also fully compliant with Safe Return to Port (SRtP) and all other applicable legislation. This example is also powered by LNG and is the longest (206.6m) and widest (28.2m) vessel ever built by Visentini.

A first rendering of the ship that was to become Corsica Linea's first new Visentini building.  Image: Design of NAOS ships and boats.
A first rendering of the ship that was to become Corsica Linea’s first new Visentini building. Image: Design of NAOS ships and boats.

The latter vessel retains an overall appearance similar to recent Visentini vessels based on the “old” platform, including the distinctive funnel design. As the Visentini construction dock in Porto Viro is only 30m wide, a delicate operation involving three tugs was required to lift the vessel from the dock. The ship will now be fitted with equipment including cabling, ventilation and fitting out of public spaces, cabins, crew rooms, etc. before delivery in the second quarter of 2022.

Corsica Linea's new Visentini Ro-Pax, yard number 238, is maneuvered out of the construction dock of the Italian shipyard.  Picture: Corsica Linea.
Corsica Linea’s new Visentini Ro-Pax, yard number 238, is maneuvered out of the construction dock of the Italian shipyard. Picture: Corsica Linea.

Corsica Linea’s new ship will accommodate 650 passengers and 2,560 meters of freight track in addition to 150 cars on a separate deck. Once delivered next year, the new ship should serve the Marseille-Bastia and Marseille-Ajaccio lines.

In addition to the Corsica Linea order, Visentini says it also has an order for another vessel over 30,000 tb for an anonymous northern European operator. Earlier this week, the company reached an agreement for dredging of the channel from the shipyard to the sea to continue until 2023.


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/visentini-launches-the-first-new-generation-ro-pax-for-corsica-linea/feed/ 0
ABS study suggests new construction has a decarbonization advantage https://seatowct.com/abs-study-suggests-new-construction-has-a-decarbonization-advantage/ https://seatowct.com/abs-study-suggests-new-construction-has-a-decarbonization-advantage/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 15:40:28 +0000 https://seatowct.com/abs-study-suggests-new-construction-has-a-decarbonization-advantage/ Posted on Sep 20, 2021 11:40 AM by The maritime executive [By: ABS] A new dual-fuel LNG carrier generates fewer CO2 emissions over its operational life than an existing LNG carrier converted to dual-fuel. This is the conclusion of a unique ABS study using vessel-based data from the Avance Gas Holding Ltd. fleet. (AGH). ABS […]]]>

Posted on Sep 20, 2021 11:40 AM by

The maritime executive

[By: ABS]

A new dual-fuel LNG carrier generates fewer CO2 emissions over its operational life than an existing LNG carrier converted to dual-fuel. This is the conclusion of a unique ABS study using vessel-based data from the Avance Gas Holding Ltd. fleet. (AGH).

ABS compared the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions between a new bi-fuel Very Large Gas Carrier (VLGC) and the conversion of two VLGC AGHs over 20 and 25 year life cycles, including decommissioning. The results suggest that the conversion increases emissions intensity from 13.7 to 32.6 percent compared to new construction.

“The decarbonisation pathways are very complex and difficult to assess how to produce the best strategy to reduce the GHG footprint over the lifetime of the assets. These decisions are important for both the operational performance of shipping lines and the environment, as well as for future investments as we embrace the carbon economy. We are therefore proud to be able to help forward-looking operators, such as AGH, to understand the challenges they face through tailor-made studies that highlight the best investment strategy, ”said Georgios Plevrakis. , ABS Director, Global Sustainable Development. . “ABS is a global leader in this field and works with major operators around the world to develop decarbonization pathways that deliver the best results for their fleets. “

The study compared the 20- and 25-year lifecycle emissions resulting from the conversion of AGH’s VLGC Monsoon from the SME diesel engine and the SMC VLGC PROMISE diesel engine to dual-fuel operations with the new vessel construction. bi-fuel with specifications to the AGH LPG gas carrier. The LPG transporter has been rated in 70 percent virgin steel and recycled steel formulations.

The products and services described in this press release are not endorsed by The Maritime Executive.


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/abs-study-suggests-new-construction-has-a-decarbonization-advantage/feed/ 0
A former soldier who fought the Nazis has a lasting memory of evil https://seatowct.com/a-former-soldier-who-fought-the-nazis-has-a-lasting-memory-of-evil/ https://seatowct.com/a-former-soldier-who-fought-the-nazis-has-a-lasting-memory-of-evil/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 11:19:46 +0000 https://seatowct.com/a-former-soldier-who-fought-the-nazis-has-a-lasting-memory-of-evil/ A former soldier who fought the Nazis shared his enduring memories of evil as he helped German civilians. Bill Wells, 93, joined the military just days after his 18th birthday and was eager to start his career and defeat the enemy. But his energy was quickly eclipsed by the reality and horrors of war and […]]]>

A former soldier who fought the Nazis shared his enduring memories of evil as he helped German civilians.

Bill Wells, 93, joined the military just days after his 18th birthday and was eager to start his career and defeat the enemy.

But his energy was quickly eclipsed by the reality and horrors of war and the brutality of the Nazis towards their own citizens.

READ MORE:A 103-year-old former soldier escaped the Nazis who recognized his “Scouse” accent

Bill, formerly known as Clarence Joseph before changing his name, was trained to Ballykinla camp where he wastaught weaponry, marksmanship and unarmed combat.

He told ECHO: “We were all extremely excited to finally enter the True Army where we could continue our chosen paths to serve with bravery and honor. “

The MyWirral newsletter will bring you news from across the borough in a way you’ve never had before.

Whether it’s celebrating people, sharing issues or discussing the latest news, our newsletter covers all things Wirral.

Signing up is free and it only takes you a minute to receive the greatest stories, sent straight to your inbox.

How to subscribe to a MyWirral email update

1) Access our newsletter page dedicated to this link.

2) Put your email in the box where indicated

3) Check MyWirral News.

4) Tap Save Changes and that’s it!

5) There are many other newsletters to choose from.

The father-of-two was assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps – something he admits he originally protested against, requesting a transfer from his drill sergeant.

He said: “I argue that, unlike other recruits, I had some war experience.

“For three years I was on sea tugs sent over the Mersey Bar to rescue damaged ships that had been attacked in convoys from the Atlantic bound for Liverpool.

“By the age of 15, I had also been involved in the towing of parts of the huge Mulberry floating ports which were used by the British and Americans on D-Day to launch the invasion of Normandy.”



Bill Wells during his days in the military

But it fell on deaf ears and Bill was dispatched to Stranraer in Scotland, then finally to Boyce Barracks, the main headquarters of the Royal Army Medical in Aldershot.

Bill, who was once Mayor of Wirral, said: “After months of intensive training we were sent to the Royal Herbert Military Hospital in Woolwich, London, for hands-on training at the hospital. After a short stay there we were eventually dispatched to join the mighty British Rhine Army.

“Our first base in Germany was the Bielefeld barracks. The town of Bielefeld was the headquarters of the combat command of the British Army of the Rhine.

“It was also the scene of the famous RAF Dambusters raid which dropped a 22,000 pound Grand Slam bomb on the Bielefeld Viaduct.”

It was here in the devastation that Bill saw the evil of war, he said, “Me and my two other platoon mates were horrified at the desolation we have witnessed. Germany has literally been flattened.

“The devastation that had befallen the Royal Air Force and the Americans was total and absolute.



A photo of Bill and his wife Sybil meeting the late Prince Phillip when Bill was mayor of Wirral
A photo of Bill and his wife Sybil meeting the late Prince Phillip when Bill was mayor of Wirral

“It’s hard to put into words the true horror of the effects of war, it’s something you really have to see for yourself. The sights of utter carnage have never left me.

Bielefeld, I also discovered, had a very dark history of its own. The Bielefeld barracks previously housed the elite Nazi Panzer regiments.

“They had trained there even before unleashing their reign of terror across the continent.

“A feeling of evil somehow permeated the whole area. It was a lean and gray place, devoid of colors, trees and birds. There was nothing pleasant about it. About Bielefeld.

“At the time there was a policy of non-fraternization [between soldiers and cavillians] in place, but few soldiers paid much attention to it.



Bill Wells when he was Mayor of Wirral
Bill Wells when he was Mayor of Wirral

“It was sad to see the plight of the civilians who remained there. Living among the bombed-out ruins, clad in rags and starving, they literally had nothing.

“Some of them spoke English and spoke of the evil of the Nazis who once ruled there. boot.”

Bill left Bielefeld for Hanover and discovered much the same horrors, he said: “Hanover, like Bielefeld, has been reduced to rubble. The 29th BMH was a huge hospital with facilities to treat some 2,000 patients at any one time.

“The commander there had already cemented his name in history after giving the order to burn down the infamous Nazi death camp at Belsen.

“The hospital employed a large German staff. I was shocked to learn that many of them, now young women who spoke excellent English, were once members of the Hitler Youth. Several of them had been inspected. by Hitler himself.

“The hospital had a huge mortuary that was in constant use. When we were on Fire Picket duty, we were all working there. It was a really miserable mission.

“There were hundreds of bodies of war dead that were being unearthed and transferred to their home countries, France, Belgium and the Netherlands for proper burial.

“The mortuary was often used to house the bodies while their carriers rested for the night before continuing their long and sad journey.

“We also received the bodies of many American and British soldiers killed in accidents and by unexploded ordnance. When I was in the Quartermaster’s staff, I was in charge of organizing their personal effects, a sad task. “

Bill remained in Hanover until his release in 1948 and says he remembers the day he returned to Lime Street station.

He said: “TThe train was filled with all branches of the army. It was a nightmare trip, stopping and starting for hours. When we finally got to Lime Street in the early hours of the morning, I was amazed at how chaotic it was. Loudspeakers screaming instructions no one could understand. Every military uniform you could imagine combined with confused civilians with their suitcases. Organized chaos at its best.



Bill's wife of 65 years, Sybil
Bill’s wife of 65 years, Sybil

“Now a free man back on Civvy Street, I was grateful to be alive and finally back home ready to begin the next phase of my life.”

Bill lived in Wallasey for much of his life, meeting the love of his life Sybil at one of the many dances in the New Brighton Tower Ballroom.

The couple were married for 65 years until Sybil died of cancer last year.

Bill’s daughter Karen Muskett, 66, said: “I look back and think of how lucky my brother Peter, 62, and I had this wonderful childhood in Wallasey and New Brighton with two loving parents for so long.



Bill Wells who served in the Royal Army Medical Corps in World War II with his novel The Jackboot
Bill Wells who served in the Royal Army Medical Corps in World War II with his novel The Jackboot

“My dad never talked about his time in the military and I think part of it is because he’s part of that generation that doesn’t show a lot of emotions and just get it right. “

With the help of his son Peter from across the Atlantic in Florida, Bill has now written a novel inspired by his time in the military.

The Jackboot is a historical fiction about the top secret mission called Operation Fish and an RAF Spitfire pilot’s quest to stop the Nazis from getting their hands on Britain’s gold reserve.

Bill said: “The things I had seen and experienced during my time in the military have always stayed with me.

“It took me over seventy years to finally put down on paper all the things I had learned and witnessed, but it was a collection of different thoughts and threads, I couldn’t just not tie all the dots together to be a readable novel.

“In 2017 my son Peter put all the pieces together and after three years of hard work and meticulous research he was able to fit them into an incredible novel, The Jackboot.”

Read more about Bill and his novel here and you can buy The Jackboot on Amazon here.

Receive newsletters with the latest news, sport and updates from ECHO Liverpool by signing up here


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/a-former-soldier-who-fought-the-nazis-has-a-lasting-memory-of-evil/feed/ 0
The missing question from the NTSB’s MV Golden Ray report: WHY? https://seatowct.com/the-missing-question-from-the-ntsbs-mv-golden-ray-report-why/ https://seatowct.com/the-missing-question-from-the-ntsbs-mv-golden-ray-report-why/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:07:30 +0000 https://seatowct.com/the-missing-question-from-the-ntsbs-mv-golden-ray-report-why/ By Salvatore R. Mercogliano, Ph.D. Two years after MV Golden ray capsized as it left the port of Brunswick, Georgia, early on September 8, 2019, the National Transportation Safety Board released its final report on the incident. The accident occurred as the vessel, under the supervision of an on-board pilot, was making a 68-degree turn […]]]>

By Salvatore R. Mercogliano, Ph.D.

Two years after MV Golden ray capsized as it left the port of Brunswick, Georgia, early on September 8, 2019, the National Transportation Safety Board released its final report on the incident. The accident occurred as the vessel, under the supervision of an on-board pilot, was making a 68-degree turn towards the sea.

With the increase in ship speed and 20 degrees of rudder commanded, Golden ray bottomed out over 8 degrees and never recovered. The vessel maneuvered out of the main shipping channel, but with a 60 degree list to port and an open hatch for the pilot, the vessel was inundated and sank to the bottom of Saint-Simon Strait. The Coast Guard and the tugs responded and quickly removed the pilot and nineteen crew members. Rescue efforts resulted in the elimination of the four remaining crew members trapped on board.

The 46-page report is filled with information and factual data about the event gathered from eyewitness accounts, testimony and expert research at the NTSB. After reviewing the facts and analyzing the facts, they determined that:

The probable cause of the capsizing of the Golden ray was the error of the mate who entered the ballast quantities into the stability calculation program, which led to his erroneous determination of the vessel’s stability and resulted in the Golden ray have insufficient righting arm to counter the forces developed during a turn when transitioning out.

The NTSB ruled out weather conditions, transfer of ballast or fuel during transit, malfunction of propulsion and steering systems, shifting of cargo, obstructions in the channel or a fire in the hold. In the absence of these, the office focused on the actions – or more accurately, the inactions – of the first mate, who also served as a cargo officer, failing to correctly capture the readings of the 21 tanks of ship’s ballast in the shipboard stability computer. (LOADCOM). This error resulted in an incorrect determination of the vessel’s stability. With this error, and the vessel not having the proper metacentric height (GM) to properly right the vessel in the last turn to the high seas as the vessel accelerated, the centers of gravity and buoyancy caused the vessel to roll when ‘he heeled over 8 degrees.

As in most NTSB reports, the who, what, where, and how are extensively studied and detailed. What is blatantly missing, however, is WHY? Why did the chief mate, who had served on the ship for over six months, with six years in car carriers and ten years as a first officer, not enter the correct data from the ballast tanks in LOADCOM. Why, after ordering the Quartermaster to probe the tanks to make sure the computer polls match the actual readings, did he enter the incorrect data. Why did he not use the automated function of the system which automatically linked this data directly to the LOADCOM computer? Finally, why did the NTSB not ask these questions?

In the end, the NTSB made two recommendations to the operating company, G-Marine Service Company, Limited. First, review their safety management system to establish procedures for verifying stability calculations and implementing audit procedures. According to the investigation, the deck master only had 3-4 hours of training on LOADCOM, although he used it to determine the stability of the vessel before and after each loading operation. He was also the only person on board who had access to this information. G-Marine hired a company to develop their loading plans, but the final post-loading information was not received until after the vessel had departed; in this case, two hours after the capsizing of the vessel.

The second recommendation was for several watertight doors that had remained open during transit and when the vessel took its catastrophic list and resulted in the vessel being flooded and the four engineers trapped. Surprisingly, there was no recommendation or action that would prevent this accident from happening again. There was no requirement that a car carrier leaving the Port of Brunswick, or any other US port for that matter, provide a statement or report on its stability. But perhaps the most glaring issue that was not addressed in the NTSB report is why the data was entered incorrectly?

The first mate gave a statement following the crash, but did not appear or make himself available during the NTSB hearing. The fact that incorrect data was entered into the LOADCOM indicates that the mate was grossly negligent in his duties, which is alleged by the fact that he did not know the main tool that he would use to determine only the stability of the ship on which he had served for six months. Either he intentionally submitted false data and did not use the automatic ballast link to LOADCOM for fear that he would show that instead of having 8.3 feet GM which was required he was at 6 feet. We come again to the question, which is never asked in the NTSB report, why?

The ship’s ballast water treatment plant is not addressed once in the report. It is shown in a graphic on page 46 which details the vessel’s water ballasting system. When Golden ray sailed into Jacksonville, Fla., the port before Brunswick, he had unloaded 1,500 MT of ballast to raise the vessel to make the required draft of 31 feet. After sailing, she took no more ballast. When he arrived at Brunswick, he also did not take any ballast while navigating the 36-foot channel, with a maximum allowable draft of 33 feet. At Brunswick, the vessel unloaded and loaded vehicles and increased the weight of its cargo by 373 MT, but was unable to take ballast; Why?

The answer lies in the fact that when a ship loads ballast, water flows into the ballast water treatment plant. It takes time to remove sediment, silt and biological organisms from the water before they can be loaded into the tanks. There is less of this material in the open blue waters of the Atlantic than in the brown waters of Saint-Simon. Additionally, material collected at the ballast water treatment plant cannot be dumped into U.S. waters but pumped ashore for further treatment, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

So why would an experienced first mate enter a fake reading into LOADCOM when he knew the computer polls had been verified? As LOADCOM data was destroyed in the crash, we cannot know for sure, but it appears the deck captain intended the vessel to display an acceptable GM, not believing the vessel would experience movement. catastrophic list. He probably intended to load ballast water once cleared off shore and in blue water. It is not known whether the chief lieutenant intended to ballast once out of Brunswick, or even to wait until the last cargo operations were completed in Baltimore.

The failure of the NTSB to resolve this issue means that car carriers in and out of Brunswick, Georgia now and for the past two years, and all other ports in the United States, may have agents on board the. ship that enter false data to avoid soiling. their ballast water treatment plant. The fact that the LOADCOM computer was not directly connected to the ballast sensors, verified by soundings, then connected to the company’s engineering company to determine the stability of the vessel, and the waiting for the verification of the load and stability data has not been discussed in this report. However, these factors contributed to the accident.

By focusing only on the deck master and, to a lesser extent, on G-Marine Services which does not have an effective vessel management system with regard to the stability of the vessel, the risk that another carrier may capsized cars in US waters have not been eliminated or even significantly reduced.

The public record of the investigation contains over 1,700 pages of factual information, including interview transcripts, photographs and other investigative material for your reading.

The 46-page marine accident report is available online at https://go.usa.gov/xMWcn.

I cover this topic and more in my video, What’s up with shipping? Why did the MV Golden Ray capsize ?, on my Youtube page.


Source link

]]>
https://seatowct.com/the-missing-question-from-the-ntsbs-mv-golden-ray-report-why/feed/ 0