Container ships – Sea Tow CT http://seatowct.com/ Mon, 21 Jun 2021 22:11:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://seatowct.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Container ships – Sea Tow CT http://seatowct.com/ 32 32 Hamburg Sud container ship damages hull scraping dock in Brazil https://seatowct.com/hamburg-sud-container-ship-damages-hull-scraping-dock-in-brazil/ https://seatowct.com/hamburg-sud-container-ship-damages-hull-scraping-dock-in-brazil/#respond Mon, 21 Jun 2021 20:47:01 +0000 https://seatowct.com/hamburg-sud-container-ship-damages-hull-scraping-dock-in-brazil/ Posted on June 21, 2021 at 4:47 PM by The maritime executive Dramatic footage emerged on social media as a boxship operated by Hamburg Sud scraped along a ferry pier on Sunday, June 20 in Santos, Brazil. Frightened ferry company employees can be heard screaming and walking away as large ships tore parts of the […]]]>


Posted on June 21, 2021 at 4:47 PM by

The maritime executive

Dramatic footage emerged on social media as a boxship operated by Hamburg Sud scraped along a ferry pier on Sunday, June 20 in Santos, Brazil. Frightened ferry company employees can be heard screaming and walking away as large ships tore parts of the ramps from the ferry landing stage.

The 10,300 TEUs Cape San Antonio was leaving the port of Santos, Brazil, for a short trip to Paranagua on Sunday afternoon. The 128,650 dwt vessel, registered in Denmark and owned by Maersk, was sailing empty with only a few boxes on board and apparently mostly with ballast. The vessel scuffed along the breakwater, causing a small breach in the hull and kinks in the hull plates on the port side. As you walk away from the wharf, you can see the ballast water rushing through the breach.

Hamburg Sud confirmed in a statement that the Cape San Antonio was involved in an incident while leaving the port complex. “So far, there is no record of casualties involved in the incident, on board or off the ship, or that the area has been polluted in any way. The company is assessing the situation and working with the authorities.

The ferry landing on the Guaruja side of the waterway was badly damaged and was closed for some time while authorities inspected the damage. Part of the loading ramps collapsed and, according to local media, the container ship was dragged into the port. Service resumed on the ferry, but passengers were posting photos of long waits and reporting delays today due to damage in the Guaruja area. The photos showed long lines of cars waiting to load onto the ferries.

Port officials said the port remained open and said they would investigate the circumstances of the crash with the Navy. They said the weather conditions at the time had no impact on navigation, although they later reported wind gusts close to 40 miles per hour.





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Seattle receives giant container cranes preparing for T5 reopening https://seatowct.com/seattle-receives-giant-container-cranes-preparing-for-t5-reopening/ https://seatowct.com/seattle-receives-giant-container-cranes-preparing-for-t5-reopening/#respond Sat, 19 Jun 2021 00:57:12 +0000 https://seatowct.com/seattle-receives-giant-container-cranes-preparing-for-t5-reopening/ Four of tallest cranes arrive for Seattle T5 retrofit (Port of Seattle) Posted on June 18, 2021 at 8:57 PM by The maritime executive Efforts are underway to expand port capacity to the extent possible in response to the continued increase in import volumes throughout the west coast of the United States. It also creates […]]]>


Four of tallest cranes arrive for Seattle T5 retrofit (Port of Seattle)

Posted on June 18, 2021 at 8:57 PM by

The maritime executive

Efforts are underway to expand port capacity to the extent possible in response to the continued increase in import volumes throughout the west coast of the United States. It also creates new opportunities for regional ports to increase their competitive position as carriers seek alternatives to avoid congestion and bottlenecks that have strained their ability to maintain their schedules.

This week, the Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA) which operates the Port of Seattle and SSA Marine which operates Terminal 5 at the port took a key milestone with their long-term plan for port expansion. Four of the tallest cranes on the West Coast have arrived in the Port of Seattle as part of the Terminal 5 modernization project.

“We believe the Northwest Seaport Alliance and Terminal 5 have a very bright future,” said Ed DeNike, president of SSA Terminals. “The purchase of these new cranes underscores our commitment to the market and to our customers. We know that bigger ships carrying increased volumes are coming. We want to be at the forefront of this curve and prepare our terminal to meet the needs of our customers.

The four ZPMC Super-Post Panamax cranes were built in China and shipped to the port on a heavy-lift vessel from Shanghai. Standing 316 feet tall with a boom reach of 240 feet, each crane can lift 100 tonnes of cargo, providing increased capacity at the port.

“The arrival of the T-5 cranes at Elliot Bay demonstrates our collaborative commitment to invest in the critical infrastructure necessary to secure the future of living wage maritime jobs in Seattle,” said Fred Felleman, Chairman of the Port Commission of Seattle and co-chair of the NWSA. . “Reopening the T-5 will not only allow us to reduce congestion in truck traffic serving the T-18, but with the new cranes capable of servicing larger vessels, more cargo can be carried on fewer vessels. In addition, impacts on air, noise and climate will be reduced by allowing ships to use shore power rather than running their generators when docked, which both benefits our killer whales and our communities. “

The new Terminal 5 cranes will begin moving goods in early 2022, when the first phase of the two-phase construction project is completed. In 2014, the port began planning the expansion and modernization of Terminal 5, which at the time could only accommodate vessels with a maximum capacity of 6,000 TEUs. Five years after the suspension of terminal operations, work finally began in July 2019 on the modernization project.

Upon completion, Terminal 5 will have 185 acres of additional capacity and dock rail to handle discretionary freight and docking. According to port officials, beyond import freight, Terminal 5 will also increase opportunities for Midwestern and Eastern Washington exporters to move their cargo to market. The new terminal will be able to accommodate the largest vessels in the trans-Pacific trade.

The NWSA is the fourth largest international seaport in the United States. In 2019, the seaport handled more than 3.3 million TEUs, a decrease of 12% from 2019. The port, however, experienced a strong rebound in 2021, with volumes increasing by more than 18% in the first five months of the year to over 1.5 million TEUs.

Seattle modernizes T5 for reopening in 2022 (Port of Seattle)



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BEST acquires new port equipment https://seatowct.com/best-acquires-new-port-equipment/ https://seatowct.com/best-acquires-new-port-equipment/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 05:00:32 +0000 https://seatowct.com/best-acquires-new-port-equipment/ The terminal introduced the cranes to the industry With the addition of two new gantry cranes and two shuttle carriers, Hutchison Port BEST now has a total of 13 quay cranes capable of operating the world’s largest container ships. The cranes are currently being commissioned and should be operational in the coming weeks. The President […]]]>


The terminal introduced the cranes to the industry

With the addition of two new gantry cranes and two shuttle carriers, Hutchison Port BEST now has a total of 13 quay cranes capable of operating the world’s largest container ships.

The cranes are currently being commissioned and should be operational in the coming weeks.

The President of the Port of Barcelona, ​​Mercè Conesa, said: “Nine years ago, Hutchison Ports BEST received its first cranes in Barcelona to start operating in this terminal.

“Today, BEST has become one of the most successful semi-automated terminals for the loading and unloading of containers not only in Europe, but worldwide. “

Since its inauguration in 2021, BEST has increased its quality standards, achieving vessel productivity of over 200 movements per hour and average crane productivity of over 40 movements per hour on a sustained basis.

The terminal is capable of operating up to three 23,000 TEU vessels simultaneously.

Conesa added; “These new cranes, capable of operating with the largest container ships on the market, will allow the Port of Barcelona to remain at the forefront of the international port sector.

“The new machines also represent a big step forward in environmental sustainability, one of our strategic axes, because the cranes have an innovative system that allows the energy generated during operation to be reused. “

Guillermo Belcastro, CEO of BEST, highlighted the value that BEST has generated for the supply chain, including efficiency at the dock, reduction of waiting times for trucks, extension of the area of ​​influence, increasing the rail quota and reducing environmental impact.

Clemence Cheng of Hutchison Port said: “After many years of operating our facility here in Barcelona, ​​we are proud to say that the vision we had many years ago to build one of the world’s most successful container terminals. Europe’s most advanced was not only achieved, but exceeded all of our expectations.



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The Panama Canal increases its length capacity to accommodate most boxships https://seatowct.com/the-panama-canal-increases-its-length-capacity-to-accommodate-most-boxships/ https://seatowct.com/the-panama-canal-increases-its-length-capacity-to-accommodate-most-boxships/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 00:08:14 +0000 https://seatowct.com/the-panama-canal-increases-its-length-capacity-to-accommodate-most-boxships/ Larger vessel test locks included the Triton in 2019 (Panama Canal Authority / AMP) Posted on June 16, 2021 at 8:08 PM by The maritime executive Ahead of the fifth anniversary of its expansion, the Panama Canal Authority announced that it had increased the maximum length allowed for vessels passing through Neopanamax Locks. This increase […]]]>


Larger vessel test locks included the Triton in 2019 (Panama Canal Authority / AMP)

Posted on June 16, 2021 at 8:08 PM by

The maritime executive

Ahead of the fifth anniversary of its expansion, the Panama Canal Authority announced that it had increased the maximum length allowed for vessels passing through Neopanamax Locks. This increase comes at a critical time when global supply chains are under strain. This means that almost all (96.8%) of the global container ship fleet can transit through the Panama Canal, shortening routes and benefiting economies around the world.

“This change was made possible by the experience of our team in the safe and reliable operation of the Neopanamax locks over the past five years,” said Ricaurte Vásquez Morales, administrator of the Panama Canal. Since the opening of the new locks to commercial traffic, the Canal Authority has taken progressive measures to increase capacity.

Since May 21, the maximum overall length of commercial and non-commercial vessels acceptable for regular transits through Neopanamax locks has been increased by just over three meters (370.33 against 367.28 meters) or by more than 10 feet (1215 versus 1205 feet).

The increased capacity to accommodate longer ships will provide shipping companies with greater flexibility in making deployment decisions, the Panama Canal said in announcing the new policy. They also believe that it will play a role in the design and construction of ships in the future with greater capacity that can transit through the Panama Canal.

Before officially increasing the length, a series of test transits were undertaken to confirm the safety of operations. They included the 369-meter-long (1,210-foot) Evergreen transit of 2019 Triton, which has become the largest vessel in dimensions and container loading capacity (14,424 TEU) to transit through the Panama Canal since the inauguration of the Neopanamax locks in June 2016. Since then, other vessels of the same dimensions and loading capacity of containers also passed through the waterway. , including the Talos and Theseus, also 14,000 TEU vessels operated by Evergreen.

In addition to this increased overall length, the Panama Canal has also increased the maximum allowable draft to the highest level allowed in the canal. The canal added an additional foot, now licensed vessel with a draft of up to 15.24 meters (50 feet). Previously, the level had been maintained at 14.93 meters (49 feet). The draft is subject to rainfall levels on the isthmus and the management of Gatun Lake water by the Panama Canal Authority. Last fall, the Panama Canal Authority began soliciting bids from international engineering companies for a comprehensive water management system designed to improve the functioning of the canal and secure the drinking water supply of the country.



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Terminal 46 changes include longshoring training – KIRO 7 News Seattle https://seatowct.com/terminal-46-changes-include-longshoring-training-kiro-7-news-seattle/ https://seatowct.com/terminal-46-changes-include-longshoring-training-kiro-7-news-seattle/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 03:53:00 +0000 https://seatowct.com/terminal-46-changes-include-longshoring-training-kiro-7-news-seattle/ SEATTLE – Major changes are coming to Pier 46 near Pioneer Square now that the Port of Seattle is not building a cruise terminal. Plans are underway to train future longshoremen and longshoremen. There is a real shortage of people trained to unload ships entering the Port of Seattle. So the port is offering space […]]]>


SEATTLE – Major changes are coming to Pier 46 near Pioneer Square now that the Port of Seattle is not building a cruise terminal.

Plans are underway to train future longshoremen and longshoremen.

There is a real shortage of people trained to unload ships entering the Port of Seattle. So the port is offering space here at Terminal 46 to help do that job.

You are forgiven if you believe that this precious waterfront real estate is not being used. After all, the pandemic has put on hold any plans to build a new terminal for the struggling cruise industry.

“We’re doing a lot of things at 46, keeping it maritime and keeping those high paying jobs in the area,” said Fred Felleman, Port of Seattle president. “There are three separate projects going on right now. “

Felleman said the first project is to turn part of the pier into a training center, using these red cranes to help train future longshoremen and women to unload container ships. Many of those who are now working are retiring.

“There’s a whole graying tsunami going on,” Felleman said. “These are very well paying jobs, and crane operators need specialized training. “

The need is particularly acute as the port is inundated with container ships full of all the goods that people buy and need to be unloaded.

“It’s not clear if this will continue in the future – unlikely at this volume,” Felleman predicted.

But he said they still needed people to unload the ships. “Absolutely,” he said. “These are skilled jobs.”

“Well I know clean energy means,” Gov. Jay Inslee, D-Wash said. “It means jobs here at the Port of Vancouver. “

Inslee tweeted about port jobs today almost 170 miles south.

“Every time a ship arrives,” he said, “it means 30 stevedores on each ship have good jobs.”

SoDo’s Terminal 46 will also be used to store some of the container overflow from Terminal 18. And the port is working on a short-term lease with the U.S. Coast Guard to moor and maintain ships like its breakers. red shell ice.

“It is a public good intended to be able to not only create income,” said Felleman, “but to create the jobs of the future.”

Felleman believes that a cruise terminal will someday be built at Terminal 46, likely to the chagrin of some residents of Pioneer Square.

But first, the cruise industry must recover from the significant losses it suffered during the pandemic.

Meanwhile, there is a great need for anyone who wants to work in the logging industry.



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Prince Rupert, British Columbia, protesters prevent Israeli ship from docking https://seatowct.com/prince-rupert-british-columbia-protesters-prevent-israeli-ship-from-docking/ https://seatowct.com/prince-rupert-british-columbia-protesters-prevent-israeli-ship-from-docking/#respond Tue, 15 Jun 2021 05:03:00 +0000 https://seatowct.com/prince-rupert-british-columbia-protesters-prevent-israeli-ship-from-docking/ An Israeli container ship was prevented from docking at the port of Prince Rupert, B.C. on Monday, after a group of about 10 protesters – whose purpose is to prevent Israel from shipping goods to the North America – formed a picket line at the entrance to the Fairview Container Terminal. . The container ship […]]]>


An Israeli container ship was prevented from docking at the port of Prince Rupert, B.C. on Monday, after a group of about 10 protesters – whose purpose is to prevent Israel from shipping goods to the North America – formed a picket line at the entrance to the Fairview Container Terminal. .

The container ship Volans, owned by the Israeli shipping company ZIM, was anchored in the port of Prince Rupert for most of the day on Sunday.

The protesters said they were acting in solidarity with a movement called Block the Boat, which aims to stop Israel from shipping goods to that continent in response to the recent conflict between Israel and Palestinian militants.

The ship was unable to dock as protesters set up a picket line at the entrance to the terminal, which unionized longshoremen would not cross. Members of Local 505 of the International Longshore Workers Union (ILWU) are responsible for securing and unloading vessels entering the terminal.

“We can’t deny that the world is an interconnected place, so the ship that lands here has an impact on the lives of people halfway around the world,” said Francis Riley, who was one of many. to carry signs.

“And I think that’s a tough point to make, but I think it’s an important point to make,” Riley said.

After confirming with the Prince Rupert Port Authority that the Volans would not unload at Prince Rupert, protesters left the entrance, allowing the port to continue operating. However, they said they would return if the ship attempted to dock again.

Protesters in Prince Rupert, British Columbia, said Monday they were acting in solidarity with a movement called “Block the Ship”, which aims to prevent Israel from shipping goods to that continent in response to the recent conflict between Israel. and Palestinian activists. (Matt Allen / CBC)

The latest round of fighting between Israel and Hamas began last month, when the militant group fired rockets at Jerusalem after days of clashes between Palestinian protesters and Israeli police.

Israel in turn launched hundreds of airstrikes which it said targeted Hamas infrastructure, including a vast network of tunnels. The airstrikes also destroyed health and civic infrastructure, a refugee camp and a skyscraper that housed the Associated Press and other media.

The 11-day conflict has since ended in a fragile fashion, with a ceasefire, and a new coalition government in Israel has indicated it will likely pursue a modest program to reduce tensions with the Palestinians.

Blocked vessel from the United States last month

In May, the Volans attempted to dock in Oakland, but the 10 members of the ILWU local also refused to cross a similar picket line in support of protesters affiliated with Block the Boat. The Volans then left for southern California before returning to Oakland to attempt to land again in early June, then left for Prince Rupert on June 4.

A protester holds up a sign at a Block the Boat rally in Prince Rupert on June 14. (Matt Allen)

“In view of the victory in Oakland, we hope that the inconvenience we have caused to ZIM shipping lines and the cost, our effectiveness in terms of political and economic impacts will also continue in Prince Rupert,” said Lara Kiswani, Director executive of the Arab Resource and Organization Center, leader of the Block the Boat campaign, in a statement.

In an emailed statement to ILWU Local 505 obtained by CBC, the International Dockworkers Council said: “We would like to express our solidarity with the comrades who choose not to cross the picket line to defend a also a noble cause.

CBC has contacted the Prince Rupert Port Authority, shipping company ZIM and DP World – The Fairview Terminal Operator – for comment, but has not yet received a response.



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COVID-19 outbreak at major Chinese port worsens global shipping crisis, which could disrupt holiday season orders, experts warn https://seatowct.com/covid-19-outbreak-at-major-chinese-port-worsens-global-shipping-crisis-which-could-disrupt-holiday-season-orders-experts-warn/ https://seatowct.com/covid-19-outbreak-at-major-chinese-port-worsens-global-shipping-crisis-which-could-disrupt-holiday-season-orders-experts-warn/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 12:15:00 +0000 https://seatowct.com/covid-19-outbreak-at-major-chinese-port-worsens-global-shipping-crisis-which-could-disrupt-holiday-season-orders-experts-warn/ Global expedition disturbances could trigger delays in goods this year holiday season, say industry experts. A COVID-19 outbreak at a major Chinese port has resulted in a backlog of shipments, exacerbating an existing maritime crisis. “Heaven knows what’s going to happen in August or September,” an expert told the BBC. “It could get crazy.” Global […]]]>


  • Global expedition disturbances could trigger delays in goods this year holiday season, say industry experts.
  • A COVID-19 outbreak at a major Chinese port has resulted in a backlog of shipments, exacerbating an existing maritime crisis.
  • “Heaven knows what’s going to happen in August or September,” an expert told the BBC. “It could get crazy.”

Global shipping disruptions could lead to a shortage of goods for the holiday season, industry experts say.

A recent coronavirus outbreak in southern China’s Guangdong Province prompted authorities to introduce strict COVID-19 measures, causing congestion at four major ports, Reuters reported Friday.
This worsens the current global shipping crisis this has driven up costs and led to a shortage of popular products, like chicken and semiconductors, as Insider’s Rachel Premack reported. “Supply chains are more complex and delicate than ever,” Tom Fairbairn, engineer at middleware firm Solace, told Insider. He recommended that customers use real-time data, for example from Unilever Database, to see if there will be disturbances or not.

“Retailers using this approach can confidently say whether or not their Christmas inventory will be delayed,” he said. Otherwise, he said, retailers could “waste existing stock, incur unnecessary late fees, miss opportunities and delay deliveries.”

China’s new port restrictions, which include disinfection checks and limits on the number of ships, have triggered a delay in expeditions in ports including Yantian, Shekou, Chiwan and Nansha.

Publicity


Yantian, “one of the largest ports in China, practically closed its doors for nearly three weeks,” Nils Haupt, communications director of the German shipping company Hapag-Lloyd, told reporters. BBC on Sunday. “They have a few berths in service, but far from sufficient.”

Delays are also “piling up” at the other three ports, Haupt said. James Baker, container shipping editor at shipping industry publication Lloyd’s List, told the BBC that retailers are already placing orders for the holiday season because they know how shipping is slow at the moment. He said this leads to more congestion.

“Traditionally, peak season for container shipping begins in the third quarter with everyone refueling for the holiday season in the west, but this year we are already in a permanent peak season, and God knows this. that’s going to happen in August or September, ”he said. “It could get crazy.”

Baker told the BBC he expects the shipping delays to last at least a year. Until then, customers in North America and Europe will continue to wait longer than usual for their orders, he said.

More than 50 container ships were expected to dock in the outer Pearl River delta on Friday, up from 20 ships at the same time last year, according to Refinitiv data cited by Reuters. It was also more than in February 2020, when the coronavirus shut down China’s shipping activities, data showed.

The industry still suffers from the traffic of 400 ships caused by the Never given container ship to stay in the Suez Canal in March. the the ship was released early April, but Maersk, the world’s largest shipping company, said could take months to resolve delays.

“We were just starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel” after the Suez Canal blocked, Haupt said. “But unfortunately, we encountered this situation in Yantian.”

The COVID-19 crisis created problems for the shipping industry – customer spending habits fluctuated during the pandemic as people stayed at home, shifting demand for shipments and destabilizing the industry.



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Feather fight is a lingering skirmish of the US-China trade war https://seatowct.com/feather-fight-is-a-lingering-skirmish-of-the-us-china-trade-war/ https://seatowct.com/feather-fight-is-a-lingering-skirmish-of-the-us-china-trade-war/#respond Sun, 13 Jun 2021 15:10:00 +0000 https://seatowct.com/feather-fight-is-a-lingering-skirmish-of-the-us-china-trade-war/ WASHINGTON – The long-awaited review of tariff policy by the Biden administration cannot come soon enough for an Ohio bedding maker, which says it is being pummeled by the US levies on imported Chinese feathers. The family business, Down-lite International Inc., secured an import duty exclusion last spring after arguing that there are few places […]]]>


WASHINGTON – The long-awaited review of tariff policy by the Biden administration cannot come soon enough for an Ohio bedding maker, which says it is being pummeled by the US levies on imported Chinese feathers.

The family business, Down-lite International Inc., secured an import duty exclusion last spring after arguing that there are few places other than China where it can get the feathers it has. need to stuff quilts, comforters and other bedding.

The exclusions that were given to Down-lite and thousands of other U.S. companies, however, expired at the end of last year, and the U.S. Trade Representative’s office said it would not consider a move. grant further exclusions until it completes a top-down review of tariffs. on these Chinese imports and others imposed by the Trump administration.

Meanwhile, no tariff has ever been imposed on many finished bedding products from China, such as down comforters and quilts, mattress covers, quilts and sleeping bags, putting Down-lite at a disadvantage. compared to its Chinese competitors in many countries. key products of the company.

“It’s basically about helping the Chinese right now while hurting American manufacturing,” said Josh Werthaiser, president of Down-lite’s feathers and down division.

In April, more than 100 House members and nearly 40 senators from both parties called on U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai to reinstate a process to request tariff exemptions.

“We support efforts to challenge inequalities in our trade relations with China,” the senators wrote. “In doing so, we recognize a practical reality… some inputs for US manufacturers and small businesses remain unavailable outside of China. “

The down bedding maker says it is being battered by US taxes on imported Chinese feathers.

The sales representative’s office did not respond to a request for comment. Asked about expired exclusions at a Senate hearing last month, Tai said the issue would be considered as part of a broader review of Chinese policy.

“The tariffs and the opt-out process will be an essential part of this review through which we will solicit solid comments from the public, Congress and all who are affected by it,” she said.

Down-lite has paid more than $ 500,000 in tariffs since the exclusions expired, said Mr Werthaiser, whose family has been in the down business for over a century and founded Down-lite in 1983.

The Mason, Ohio Company manufactures plush down comforters and blankets, down comforters, mattress toppers and other types of bedding, sold in a variety of sizes, such as under the Charter Club label at Macy’s, or in partnership with brands such as like Tommy Bahama, Eddie Bauer and others. The products can be found in thousands of hotels around the world. The company also processes down it imports for other industries, such as manufacturers of furniture or sleeping bags and outerwear.

Although there is a tariff on pillows from China, other trading partners can also import this finished product duty free.

Business is seasonal and employment at Down-lite’s US facilities in Ohio and North Carolina typically ranges from 375 to 425 people. Currently, the workforce is around 325.

Down-lite tariffs will be worsened by the loss of business to Chinese rivals, who have a significant price advantage since they currently do not face tariffs on many products, company executives say. .

“If that doesn’t change, I’m very confident to tell you that we need to move production overseas, and it’s going to cost us, in our communities, at least 60 to 75 jobs,” said Joe Crawford, head of Down-lite. executive.

China has been a challenge for many U.S. furniture, textiles, and furnishings companies since it joined the World Trade Organization in 2001.

“It started out as a trickle, but really turned into a tidal wave about 15 or 20 years ago,” Crawford said.

Down-lite was able to hang on because of a bizarre advantage: the downy of its bedding. Chinese labor was so cheap for so long that many products could be made there, loaded efficiently into container ships, and still sold at a lower price than American products.

But fluffy bedding muddies that equation. An entire container contains a relatively small amount of finished down comforters, only about 1,000 or 1,500, Werthaiser said. The same container can hold up to 10,000 cartridge cases. You can compress the raw feathers, but if you compress the finished bedding too much for shipping, it ruins it.

“Our stuff, you want it fluffy,” Mr. Werthaiser said. “We have always been able to repel by tucking in the compressed down and feathers, by blowing it into our pillows here” or into other bedding.

But even then, he said, it was hard to compete – and tariffs became a tipping point.

A duvet cover is prepared at the Down-lite factory.

Former President Donald Trump imposed a series of tariffs on Chinese products in an attempt to reduce the trade deficit with China and help American manufacturers. The two countries signed a trade deal in 2020, but the United States maintained tariffs on Chinese products as leverage to force China to implement trade secret protections and purchase commitments under the framework. of the agreement.

The Trump administration first considered imposing tariffs on feathers as part of its third tariff bracket in 2018. Mr. Werthaiser traveled to Washington to argue his case at USTR hearings and felt he was convincing when the product was withdrawn.

But when tensions escalated with China in 2019, feathers were added to the list, leading Down-lite to pursue an exclusion.

Among other things, the company had to prove that it had no other viable source for goose and duck feathers, which are largely a by-product of birds raised for meat.

“Over 85% of total waterfowl consumption is due to domestic meat consumption in China; thus, they control the vast majority of the global supply chain, ”the company said in its filing with the USTR. The United States, on the other hand, produces only about 1% of these feathers.

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Companies filed more than 52,000 requests for tariff exclusions, and nearly 46,000 were refused, with USTR arguing that the companies could find other sources, or that they had failed to demonstrate that their business would be compromised.

In March 2020, the USTR accepted Down-lite’s arguments and granted them an exclusion and a refund of fares already paid.

But the outgoing Trump administration has allowed almost all exclusions to expire by the end of 2020, except for a hundred items deemed medically necessary, such as face masks used to prevent the spread of Covid- 19.

The colorful bags contain raw down and feathers used by Down-lite.

Down-lite and other companies that have been granted exclusions have assumed that the Biden administration will quickly reinstate the exclusions or remove tariffs altogether. Instead, the tariffs remained in effect pending the review.

“They are very upset,” said Robert Leo, partner at Meeks, Sheppard, Leo & Pillsbury, who worked with Down-lite on his exclusion request. He also represents the Home Fashion Products Association, some of whose members have also been harmed by the expiration of exclusions.

“They were producing jobs in the United States, they were exporting from the United States, and it took that breath away and gave it to their Chinese competitors,” he said. “It’s not Walmart where they can go back to the Chinese manufacturers and say ‘no, you have to pay the tariffs.’ They are family businesses and so they had to absorb that.”

Write to Josh Zumbrun at Josh.Zumbrun@wsj.com

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One person died in never-before-seen rescue mission https://seatowct.com/one-person-died-in-never-before-seen-rescue-mission/ https://seatowct.com/one-person-died-in-never-before-seen-rescue-mission/#respond Sat, 12 Jun 2021 09:36:47 +0000 https://seatowct.com/one-person-died-in-never-before-seen-rescue-mission/ The Suez Canal Authority said one person died during the Ever Given rescue operation in March. In a Facebook post, the SCA said “one death” was among the “biggest losses” in authority. The circumstances surrounding the person’s reported death are unclear. See more stories on the Insider business page. The Suez Canal Authority (SCA) recently […]]]>


  • The Suez Canal Authority said one person died during the Ever Given rescue operation in March.
  • In a Facebook post, the SCA said “one death” was among the “biggest losses” in authority.
  • The circumstances surrounding the person’s reported death are unclear.
  • See more stories on the Insider business page.

The Suez Canal Authority (SCA) recently revealed that one person is believed to have died during the six-day operation that finally freed the gigantic container ship Ever Given from a sandbank in April.

In many statements on the official SCA Facebook page, Posted from May 26 to 27, the canal authorities listed the damage suffered as a result of the incident.

Among them, he notes “one death, the sinking of one of our rescue boats and 48 ships having to find alternative routes”.

Read more: The 4 biggest losers of the Suez Canal fiasco – and 4 surprising winners

In another statement posted on Facebook, the authority said: “The losses highlighted by the SC authority due to the Ever Given stranding crisis incident that can be seen are the damage suffered by a number of participating marine units and the sinking of one of the marine SCA. units during rescue operations, resulting in the death of one of the participants.

It is not known who died and how exactly this reported death occurred. There is also no trace of a tug or marine unit that sank during the operation.

The insider contacted the SCA for more information, but did not receive a response in time for the post.

The Japanese container ship Ever Given made headlines in March after it ran aground on the single-track stretch in a sandstorm, blocking the Suez Canal for six days and significantly disrupting global trade.

Lawyers acting on behalf of the Japanese company Shoei Kisen Kaisha, which owns the vessel, said SCA was responsible for Ever Given’s grounding as they allowed it to enter the canal in inclement weather conditions.

The accusation comes as Egyptian officials have asked the company to pay $ 600 million in compensation for the disruption caused by the blockage. They originally requested $ 916 million.

However, the ship’s insurer has stated that this amount is still too high.

The huge container ship is currently still impounded in Great Amer Lake, a body of water about 30 miles from where it first got stuck.



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Why high container rates are likely to persist https://seatowct.com/why-high-container-rates-are-likely-to-persist/ https://seatowct.com/why-high-container-rates-are-likely-to-persist/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 17:49:36 +0000 https://seatowct.com/why-high-container-rates-are-likely-to-persist/ Shanghai Yangshan (Bert Van Dijk / CC BY NC SA 2.0) Posted on June 11, 2021 at 1:49 PM by Brian Gicheru Kinyua Last month, The Maritime Executive reported on the explosive rise in container prices on major global trade routes. The result is increased shipping costs, posing an additional economic burden for a world […]]]>


Shanghai Yangshan (Bert Van Dijk / CC BY NC SA 2.0)

Posted on June 11, 2021 at 1:49 PM by

Brian Gicheru Kinyua

Last month, The Maritime Executive reported on the explosive rise in container prices on major global trade routes. The result is increased shipping costs, posing an additional economic burden for a world already struggling to recover from a pandemic. The silver lining of this is appreciated by shipping carriers, which show record profits.

Is there a likelihood that the situation will normalize in the short and long term? Maybe not, according to Jan Hoffman, head of the Trade Logistics Branch at UNCTAD.

In its wake, the Covid-19 pandemic has caused immense trade restrictions throughout the global supply chain, as has been felt in Yantian, Los Angeles and many other ports. Slowing terminals lead to inefficiencies along intermodal connections, forcing containers to spend approximately 20% more time in the system for each shipment. Until the pandemic is contained, he believes the situation will get even worse, leading to ever higher freight rates.

Additionally, Hoffman observes that for over a decade carriers have enjoyed very low freight rates. “To reduce unit costs, carriers have invested in ever larger and newer vessels, but the problem is that older vessels have not been scrapped – and overcapacity has remained,” Hoffman wrote in a blog posted on his LinkedIn account. That said, the race to build larger ships (for economies of scale) will likely reach the maximum ship size possible in the near future, Hoffman noted.

Over the years, the shipping industry has undergone consolidation, resulting in fewer carriers than before. Thus, “competition and choices for shippers have diminished while capacity and stopover management options have improved, from a carrier perspective,” Hoffman notes. This leaves carriers in an advantageous position to dictate freight rates over shippers.

Hoffman also believes that ongoing decarbonization efforts may lead to slightly higher freight rates. A recent UNCTAD analysis on this topic concluded that IMO’s initial strategy on reducing greenhouse gas emissions – such as speed limits – although having an immediate positive impact on the footprint industry carbon could also lead to higher freight rates. However, such an increase will be very small compared to the current volatility of rates caused by market forces. Until the industry fully shifts to cleaner fuels, we cannot rule out the effects of decarbonization on tariffs.

Hapag-Lloyd’s announcement on Friday that it would suspend all imports at East Malaysian ports is a testament to the fact that peak freight rates have yet to be reached. Hapag-Lloyd said power space limitations were the reason for its decision.

“This in turn is another indication of the overall shortage of container ships available in the market. And when there are not enough ships on the market, some routes will run out of capacity, ”commented Lars Jensen, CEO of Vespucci Maritime, who was quick to say his feelings had not intend to establish a causal link with the Hapag-Lloyd announcement.

These operational bottlenecks ultimately lead to high freight rates, similar to the container shortage observed during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Top image: Shanghai Yangshan (Bert Van Dijk / CC BY NC SA 2.0)

The opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Maritime Executive.



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